Home Forums General Discussions Open Topic U.S. citizens… Your rights are in serious jepardy!!!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 44 total)
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  • #68636

    buckingham rabbit
    Participant

    fascists!!

    #68637

    everyonelovesjaron
    Participant

    DEAR GOD, Please do not take away my ability to use MP3s… I may have to buy albums!!11

    #68638

    Halfman
    Participant

    I appreciate your vigilance as always, Matt.
    As we have been shown time and time again, strength in numbers and connections wield the most influence. I advocate going the letter writing gig one better: Let’s form a grass-roots organization!!

    If we can show that our voice is more than just a few scattered virtuous nags, I think we stand a chance of making a difference that sticks.
    Recently, my school has formed a Poli Sci club that is looking at a wide scope of thngs. I would be happy to get this issue brought up, as we plan to be luring in speakers from all levels of government in the coming times. We had Nader last year and Rep. John Lewis from Georgia this year.

    Please email me and let me know what you think:

    [email protected]

    Tom

    #68639

    AGAP
    Participant

    Angry Million Geek March… <img> <img> <img>

    Swine!!! Our pm in Canada has been talking about taxing MP3 players $20 per MB of memory, more tax like thats a surprise or something…the canadian way <img>

    Write in, contact the senator of your nitemare and let them know exactly what you think of this piece of something attempt to control people <img>

    Allison

    #68640

    Mattman
    Participant

    </font><blockquote><font>quote:</font><table><tr><td><table><tr><td>Originally posted by Jaron:
    <strong>DEAR GOD, Please do not take away my ability to use MP3s… I may have to buy albums!!11</strong></td></tr></table></td></tr></table></blockquote>Jaron, I sincerely hope you’re being sarcastic… Did you read the articles? This goes WAAAY beyond a few mp3 rippers… <img>

    #68641

    everyonelovesjaron
    Participant

    </font><blockquote><font>quote:</font><table><tr><td><table><tr><td>Originally posted by Mattman:
    <strong> </font><blockquote><font>quote:</font><table><tr><td><table><tr><td>Originally posted by Jaron:
    <strong>DEAR GOD, Please do not take away my ability to use MP3s… I may have to buy albums!!11</strong></td></tr></table></td></tr></table></blockquote>Jaron, I sincerely hope you’re being sarcastic… Did you read the articles? This goes WAAAY beyond a few mp3 rippers… <img> </strong></td></tr></table></td></tr></table></blockquote>Yes, the articles do, and I was hlaf-sarcastic.

    I see a great deal of people discussing this issue, and quite frankly, 99.9% of people just want to be cheap SOBs and expose legal loopholes to get free music. I can’t say what your true intentions are, but I’m getting to the point where I’d live without said amenimities if I didn’t ever have to go to a concert and hear some kid say, "Man, You know what song I like… I don’t know the names, I burned the CD online."

    #68642

    Halfman
    Participant

    I certainly see your point, Jaron. I am sure many people out there are using Mp3’s for nothing more than a way to avoid paying for the work of an artist who they so righteously claim to like.

    However, the concern has become an oroborus, or the snake that eats its own tail. To deal with the mass of Mp3 downloaders, the interest groups of note have taken broad-based measures that punish all read again all consumers. I will not be repetitive in listing those measures. We have enough threads that give the specifics.
    I will only mention the most obvious affect measure: increasing costs for the cd’s we continue to buy.

    I find that the loss the industry suffered in the Patriot bill fiasco sets a precedent of hope. If every single person who could be informed of the proceedings would write one lousy letter to their congressman and appropriate level Cabinet department, this issue could get the media influence it needs to turn the industry itself into that tail eating snake when it had to explain itself before the nation’s eyes and ears.

    It seems what we are lacking the most to make it happen is unity,education and willingness to act. God bless the Mattman for keeping one eye open and an ear to the wind.

    Again, what I am offering is a chance for us to use all of our resources collectively to let each and every congressman and executive office know we are on the same page. How do we do this?

    1) Write those letters. Then we each exchange them with each other until we each have several or hopefully, a stack. Mail them to local state and federal government. Since we have Amendments in the Constitution that gives the states certain powers, they too should be informed of these matters, as they mostly each set individual sales taxes and regulate intrastate commerce. If some local labels draw most of their income in the metropolitan area they exist in, certainly they will be interested in any local shifts in sales tax or even something as far-fetched as bond revenues that a dissenting congressman voted for increasing that raises rent for studios. You have to look at unrelated issues and how those events can be used to garner support for the building of networks. Pervasive awareness is key, folks.

    2) If the support gets big enough, the chance always exists to get an 800 number to generate polls or questionaires. Certainly, this would be a ways off but, not impossbile to think about.

    3) Just believe!!!! If AIDS activists and the Religious Right can keep drawing up funds and participation, we can’t we? Is having your entertainment socially, economically and politically controlled without representation palatable?
    I have a "true intention" of freedom and expressing myself artistically. Likewise, I wish to have the right to hear others do the same for appropriate value and without duress.

    Again, I implore as many people who claim to have interest or be affected by these recent events to step forward and band together. In the event personal preferences take charge and you would like someone else to do the organizing, so be it. I would be happy to just take part and offer my help and resources. I have no hidden agenda to recall, nor does my resume need any padding. Believe it or not, I am just out to do the next right thing.

    Tom

    <small>[ 03-23-2002, 11:52 PM: Message edited by: Half-Man ]</small>

    #68643

    malcom
    Participant

    What I want to know is– How can the US government place sanctions on Internet activity? It is th WORLD WIDE web after all. Close as they are, the US government isn’t the global government yet.

    #44938

    Mattman
    Participant

    The Consumer Broadband and Digital Television Promotion Act (CBDTPA), formerly known as the SSSCA (notice the new, deceptively user friendly name), has recently been indroduced to the senate by Sen. Fritz Hollings (D-SC).

    This bill, if made law, will require that all electronic devices, including computers, that can play or record audio or video, be equiped with a hardware rights-management device, that would basically control what you would or would not be able to do with copyrighted material. This not only violates our fair-use rights, but it will effectively kill any open-source software out there, and put the technology industry at the mercy of big media (RIAA, MPAA), since they’ll have to license the technology from them. This law is little more than a money-making scheme to allow big media to control your rights, and sell them back to you…

    WE MUST NOT LET THIS PASS!!! Please right your congress critters and let them know that you won’t stand for it. Physical letters and faxes are best, but email’s cool too…

    I’ve included several links below to explain this thing in greater detail, as well as way to find out who your senators and reps. are…

    Click here to find you senators and rep.

    DigitalConsumer.org one of the better sites in the overall battle for digital consumer rights.

    Anti-Copy Bill Hits D.C. from Wired.com

    What Hollings’ Bill Would Do from Wired.com

    Anti-Copy Bill Slams Coders from Wired.com

    Hollings thinks we’re all stupid from Ars Technica’s front page (love the title).

    CBDTPA introduced in Senate discussion from Ars Technica’s "Soap Box" forum.

    <img> <img> <img> <img> <img> <img> <img> <img>

    #68644

    K7 Rides Again
    Participant

    AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!!!!!!!
    OK, but instead of wastin my time and energy replying…i’m going to write my congressman!!!
    I strongly encourage everyone else who reads this article to get involved and do the same!!!
    It’s time to take back what is ours. This is the peole’s state…and the people should get what the people want!!!

    VIVA LA REVOLUTION!!!

    <small>[ 03-23-2002, 12:46 PM: Message edited by: kurticus7 ]</small>

    #68645

    Mattman
    Participant

    </font><blockquote><font>quote:</font><table><tr><td><table><tr><td>Originally posted by Jaron:
    <strong>
    …and quite frankly, 99.9% of people just want to be cheap SOBs and expose legal loopholes to get free music. </strong></td></tr></table></td></tr></table></blockquote>"99.9%", huh? Care to list the source of your statistics?

    My "true intentions" in this is to keep vigilent of my rights, for myself, as well as those who do not, because, well, someone has to… Lest we have these greedy few trample our rights for a short-sighted, quick buck.

    I could also go into the big media’s unwillingness to adapt to an obviously changing world, in order to cling to, from what I believe to be, an out-dated business model. But that should probably be discussed in a separate thread…

    Somehow, the phrase "guilty untill proven innocent" keeps coming to mind… I could have sworn it was supposed to be the other way around.

    PS, glad you got my back, Tom. <img> It’s late now, so I’ll email you tomorrow…

    #68646

    Halfman
    Participant

    Malc,

    Article I, Section 8 allows Congress "power to regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several States and with the Indian tribes."

    This boils down to interstate commerce, which, since the time John Marshall was Chief Justice in the late 1700’s to early 1800’s, has been the responsiblity of Congress to enforce.

    Usage of this Article, in accordance with the First Amendment regarding free speech. appears to be the main issue to resolve. Maybe more facets of our legislative backbone will need an adjustment. I would need to do more research to see.

    #68647

    everyonelovesjaron
    Participant

    </font><blockquote><font>quote:</font><table><tr><td><table><tr><td>Originally posted by Mattman:
    <strong>

    My "true intentions" in this is to keep vigilent of my rights, for myself, as well as those who do not, because, well, someone has to… Lest we have these greedy few trample our rights for a short-sighted, quick buck.

    I could also go into the big media’s unwillingness to adapt to an obviously changing world, in order to cling to, from what I believe to be, an out-dated business model. But that should probably be discussed in a separate thread…

    Somehow, the phrase "guilty untill proven innocent" keeps coming to mind… I could have sworn it was supposed to be the other way around.

    PS, glad you got my back, Tom. <img> It’s late now, so I’ll email you tomorrow…</strong></td></tr></table></td></tr></table></blockquote>I repeat my original idea: MP3s are evil. They are an outdated model of what audio compression should be. MP3s and people who d/l them have directly caused all this legislation.

    As for rights, bullshit. History proves a few assholes ruin everything for everyone, and this is no different. Music is not made to be free, it is made to cost $12.88 a CD at Best Buy. Where people get off acting high and mighty like their rights are being infringed makes me laugh like a monkey.

    Big buisnes, as ad populum Matt likes to call it, is 100% in the correct. Every music artist you like is only available because some buisness took a risk on them and decided to print records. Big buisness is not wrong. Insolent fuckwads who try to screw over big buisness and make it less profitable for big buisness to make more records are in the wrong.

    Fact – it takes 500,000 records sold, for the label to break even financially. Outdated buisness model or not, MP3 users make it more difficult for records to be sold.

    Frankly, I’d rather have bands still be around because big buisness can make money off them then we all have the right to d/l MP3s and whatever other shit Matt wants to whine about.

    In conclusion, Maynard James Keenan put it best, "I sold my soul to make a record, and then you bought one."

    #68648

    malcom
    Participant

    "One part of the bill overrides a landmark lawsuit that said the Rio MP3 player did not violate copyright law. "

    Today’s episode of congress is brought to you by Rio.

    <img> <img>

    #68649

    Javro
    Moderator

    Steady on Jaron.

    You’re close to talking sense….

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